How to increase your earning potential...

School Of Personal Training Posted Jan 15, 2014 Future Fit Training


Whilst many PTs opt to run their own studio or mobile business, there’s many reasons why working out of a health club could be a better fit for you.

How to increase your earning potential...

In a recent report from the International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association (IHRSA), some interesting statistics reveal the health club market is thriving, with the 48,000 fitness clubs in Europe generating €25 billion in 2013, around 40% of total global industry revenue. So there’s clearly still a huge number of potential PT clients using larger gyms.

It’s not just about access to a larger number of people with health and fitness goals though. At the IHRSA European Congress in Madrid last October, chair of the board of directors Brent Darden presented a number of guidelines on best practice for personal training business models in health clubs. Some of these are already being used by gyms and other fitness facilities in the UK, and they’re geared towards increasing revenue, for both the club and the trainer.

As an example, Darden advocated the use of a tiered structure to personal training services, with more advanced and experienced trainers reaching higher levels where they can charge and earn more. Continued professional development and ongoing education are essential for fitness trainers, but the adoption of this kind of formal career progression system provides an added incentive for PTs to stay on top of their game if they want to maximise their success.

So if you’re considering where to set up your PT business, or thinking about a change, it’s worth finding out what the different options are and what is on offer.

Why not take a look at the advice in our Careers section which also includes information on a range of companies the School of PT has links with.

 

          

 

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